How Your Neon Sign is Made

 

Locomocean is now one the largest manufacturers of handmade glass neon signs in the world and we are focused on being able to offer the coolest and most authentic, quality neon for an affordable price.

Our Glass neon signs have a few key differences to the usual type of neon sign that people think of. Locomocean neon sign signs are low wattage, like a normal household bulb. This is important for a few reasons. Firstly our neon’s are very safe because they do need have high voltage needed to power them and do nto get hot. They are also energy efficient and do not cost anymore to run than a usual lamp.

 

Something we get asked frequently is how are glass Neon signs made?

Each neon sign is made by hand from the traditional technique of glass blowing. Starting with a long tube of glass, each design is expertly blown into shape by hand by heating over an open flame.

 

Take a look at the video below to see our craftsman at work.

 

Following a template, the glass blowers must bend the glass into shape just as the glass is hot enough. To stop the glass from breaking or shattering when being bent they blow into the glass tube to stop the glass from flattening and so it keeps its regular tubular form.

Through this traditional process of shaping the design by eye and manually moulding the glass you get a light that is unique and special.

 

How neon signs work and get their famous colour and glow.

Glass neon signs get their colour from either coloured glass or from Neon or Argon gases filling a coated clear glass tube. Neon appears Red and Argon Blue. When applying a high voltage it ionizes the gas, causing it to emit coloured light due to fluorescence. Coating the inside of the glass with fluoresecent powder creates alternative colours.

Once the colour and brightness are chosen the glass is sealed with a metal electrode on each end and carefully placed within our acrylic box casing and connected to a low voltage electrical driver which is thoroughly tested before boxing and shipping.